Healthwise
Para imprimir: Use la función de imprimir de su navegador de Internet. Cierre esta ventana después de imprimir.

Excision for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

Índice de Materias

Surgery Overview

Excision is the removal of a skin cancer along with some of the healthy skin tissue around it (margin). For this procedure, a local anesthetic is used to numb the area.

After the cancerous area is removed, the incision is closed with stitches. If the incision is large, sometimes a skin graft or flap is required. Reconstructive surgery may be needed if the excision surgery creates a scar.

Standard excision is different from Mohs micrographic surgery. In Mohs surgery, the skin cancer is removed one layer at a time. Each layer is checked under a microscope right away. By doing Mohs surgery, the surgeon can cut away all the cancer cells and spare as much healthy skin as possible.

What To Expect After Surgery

Recovery from skin cancer surgery varies depending on the site and how much skin is removed.

Why It Is Done

Standard excision works well to remove basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas. But Mohs surgery works better for some skin cancer in places (such as the face) where it is important to save as much skin as possible.

How Well It Works

Standard excision treatment for basal cell carcinoma less than 20 mm (0.8 in.) wide has cure rates as high as 95 out of 100 people, when done with 4 mm (0.2 in.) margins.1 When standard excision is used to treat squamous cell carcinoma, about 92 out of 100 people are cured. In most cases, Mohs micrographic surgery has cure rates that are a little higher than excision cure rates.2

Risks

Risks of using excision to remove skin cancers include the following:

What To Think About

The edges (margins) of the skin where a skin cancer was removed will be examined in a lab by a pathologist to see whether any cancer cells still remain outside the area of skin that was removed. It is extremely important that the entire skin cancer be removed to reduce the risk of recurrence.

References

Citations

  1. Carucci JA, et al. (2012). Basal cell carcinoma. In LA Goldman et al., eds., Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine, 8th ed., vol. 1, pp. 1294–1303. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  2. Green AC, McBride P (2014). Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (non-metastatic). BMJ Clinical Evidence. http://clinicalevidence.bmj.com/x/systematic-review/1709/overview.html. Accessed October 2, 2014.

Créditos para Excision for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

Current as of: April 29, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
E. Gregory Thompson MD - Internal Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Amy McMichael MD - Dermatology


Nota: El "documento para imprimir" no contiene toda la información disponible en el documento en línea. Parte de la información (por ejemplo, referencias a otros temas, definiciones o ilustraciones médicas) sólo está disponible en la versión en línea.

© 1995-2020 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise para cada decisión de la salud, y el logo de Healthwise son marcas de fábrica de Healthwise, Incorporated.
Esta información no reemplaza la consulta médica. Healthwise, Incorporated niega toda garantía y responsabilidad por el uso de esta información.

La Enciclopedia de la Salud contiene información general de salud. No todos los tratamientos o servicios descritos son beneficios cubiertos para los miembros de Kaiser Permanente ni se ofrecen como servicios de Kaiser Permanente. Para obtener una lista de los beneficios cubiertos, consulte su Evidencia de Cobertura (Evidence of Coverage) o el Resumen de la Descripción del Plan (Summary Plan Description). Para saber más acerca de los tratamientos recomendados, consulte a su proveedor de atención médica.